Weekly Excerpt From: GRAMMAR FOR PEOPLE WHO HATE RULES by Kathleen A. Watson

Don’t Leave As far as Hanging:
Anchor It With a Verb

Lots of today’s communication is abbreviated, but here’s usage I hear daily that is so shortened, it’s grammatically incorrect:

  • As far as dogs, collies are my favorite.
  • As far as weather, we’re expecting a great weekend.
  • As far as movies, I’d rather watch them in a theater than at home.
  • As far as a house, we’re looking for a two-story.

As far as is a prepositional phrase; it requires something further — a verb in these examples — to help it make sense:

  • As far as dogs go, collies are my favorite.
  • As far as weather is concerned, we’re expecting a great weekend.
  • As far as movies are concerned, I’d rather watch them in a theater than at home.
  • As far as our house choices go, we’re looking for a two-story.

You also could correct the first set of examples by substituting the prepositional phrase with regard to:

  • With regard to dogs, collies are my favorite.
  • With regard to weather, we’re expecting a great weekend.

Or you could use in terms of:

  • In terms of movies, I’d rather watch them in a theater than at home.
  • In terms of house styles, we’re looking for a two-story.
  • Killer Tip: Don’t cut as far as or similar prepositional phrases to a point that leaves your statement grammatically incomplete. As far as grammar is concerned, you’ll sound better educated if you include an appropriate verb form that links this common prepositional phrase to the rest of your sentence.

Writing and grammar expert Kathleen Watson, fondly known as The Ruthless Editor, has nearly three decades of experience in both corporate and academic worlds. She has taught business people how to fine-tune their communication style, college students how to strengthen their writing, and Ph.D. candidates how to polish their dissertations. Kathy also has experience as a fiction and nonfiction book copy editor, working with a mix of new and experienced authors.

In addition to writing her own book on grammar, she blogs at RuthlessEditor.com, sharing weekly tips on how to write to get the job you want, earn the promotion you’ve worked hard for, and artfully explain your best ideas.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s